Monday, 21 November 2011

Music To Your Ears?









This is the wind turbine at Ringmer, East Sussex, built to supply power to the Glyndebourne Opera House. It's brand new, having been delivered only five or six weeks ago. As you can imagine, it's caused considerable controversy with the planning application and subsequent public enquiry rumbling on for years. Apparently, it's the first industrial scale turbine ever to be built in a National Park. The above picture was taken from three or four miles away, and from this distance it has a strange ghostly appearance. It was also taken with a zoom lens, so this one gives a better idea of the scale:



The turbine is built on a hill overlooking the village of Ringmer (three miles from Lewes), and the next picture is taken from the village.



I'd be the first to admit that it's not as lovely close up. But to my eyes at least, it's better looking than the pylon in the picture! 



And this one's from the site itself. It's 67metres from the base to the tip of the sails; if you can just make out the man in the dark jacket standing near the base, you get some idea of how huge it is! Glyndebourne claim that it will supply 90% of their electricity needs, and they promise to regularly publish the details on their website. It's not actually sited particularly close to the opera house, although presumably they own the land that it's on.

If I lived in Ringmer, I honestly think I could ignore it. I think it actually adds something, although that's more obvious from a couple of miles away. Some people say it will be very noisy, and that would be the only issue for me if I lived there. The sails were rotating slowly when I took these pictures (yesterday), and there wasn't a sound from it, but I have no idea if it's even working yet.

If you'd like to know more:




I'd love to know what you think......







7 comments:

  1. Well I think it's fine. On its own it looks quite majestic as opposed to some of the wind farms which can look a bit odd stuck in the middle of the countryside. I suppose I wouldn't particularly like one in my back garden but I do think some people overreact to these things - we can't keep relying on fossil fuels so at the end of the day we just have to move on.

    This dynamic view setting works well with your blog Martin, especially as you have lots of photos. I read that some people were experiencing problems with it so I've been reluctant to experiment with it myself - although on seeing yours it certainly gives a fresh, modern look. Probably time for me to have a change - I think I've been on my current setting for a while and I'm bored with it. I shall have to finds some time for a fiddle...

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  2. Your photographs certainly lend an air of towering majesty, but I have to say I find the things very ugly. I’m not convinced by the arguments that they are the way forward either.

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  3. It's certainly impressive from an engineering point of view, but I still think it's better to site them out at sea. Good to see you back. Where have you been?

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  4. Jane Turley - I think it looks better by itself. There's a wind farm at Rye, and it looks a little strange, at least to me. Glad you like the new look, I was bored of the old one! My stats have gone through the roof; at least if you believe Blogger! We'll see....

    Little Nell - I have a pylon right outside my front window, and I prefer the turbine to that. Although some of that may be novelty value, I suppose. The key test is whether they work or not. We'll all have to wait and see!

    Martin - I've not been anywhere, but I have been working nights. Somehow, I seem to have less time at the moment. Not only that, I'm short of things to write about!

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  5. I dont have a problem with their appearance (I know plenty who do!).As you say,things like pylons look far worse.And what about Advertising Billboards ?(albeit usually in urban areas) we have lived with visual pollution for many years.

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  6. I definitely prefer them to electricity pylons. Less of a health risk too. I think we need to accept them as part of the landscape - just as telegraph poles and tramwires were all accepted many years ago. They are necessary to keep our green places green.

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  7. Whole farms of wind turbine are popping up like mushrooms around the Great Lakes where I live and like your turbine, there are causing quite the controversy.

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